Circle skirts seam like a good idea

I know, fellow Melburnians, it really isn’t the right weather to be gadding about in this summery clothes combo. But I wanted to show you this skirt I made a few months ago – and anyway, it’s always warm somewhere in the world! This is one of the pieces I made in a dyeing session with Georgia McCorkill (who happened to have her birthday yesterday, so it’s kind of fitting for me to be posting about her today! Happy birthday for yesterday, Georgia!).

After realising how flattering and feminine circle skirts can be, I wanted to make another one, but didn’t have any material that was wide enough. So I sewed together three lengths of plain organic cotton (bought in a village in Laos two years ago) to make a square, cut my circle from that, then stitched the hem and put bias binding around the waist hole before dyeing it. Here’s my crappy drawing (yes, DRAWING which I then SCANNED) to try to explain how I joined the material. Computer program drawing skillz, I don’t haz them…

 Of course this means that there are noticeable seams, but rather than worrying about them being standing out, I decided to think of them as a design feature. So in the photos above, I’m wearing the skirt with the seams running vertically, while below…

…they are running horizontally. I suppose they’re not really that obvious, especially as the rest of the skirt is not dyed evenly (kind of on purpose, kind of by mistake, but meh…). Anyway, I just wanted to show you how one skirt can be worn two ways for a slightly different effect. I put a casing around the waistband and ran elastic through it, so it also changes slightly depending on how the material is gathered.

You could easily make a more obvious two-way skirt by using material in two colours (or more, depending on how many panels you use) – it could be handy for using up odd bits and pieces, if the fabrics are a similar weight. And with that thought, I’m off to collect several garbage bags full of material from a friend’s place. She’s cleaning up, so I score the fabric! Now, where to put it…

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